Inevitable stock market crash, says Mark Faber. Is this possible or even probable?

Inevitable stock market crash, says Mark Faber. Is this possible or even probable? His forecast:

 

mark faber prediction of market crash
click on image above for link to CNBC news story

 

Mr. Faber isn’t a prophet. He’s a student of history. His basic message is simply this: The U.S. is overdue for an economic correction.

I point to biblical economics and to a secular Russian economist’s research to highlight the 7-year and 50-year natural cycles of economic booms and busts.

First, the biblical model for economics.

Deuteronomy chapter 15 addresses cancellation of debts every seven years. Federal law provides Chapter 13 bankruptcy protection to cancel personal debts through a 7-year cycle.

Leviticus 25 provides for the 50th year of Jubilee at the end of seven sevens.

The seventh year of each cycle is called the Shemitah and you can read books and listen to podcasts that tell you all about this phenomenon.

Russian economist Nikolai Kondratieff studied history and the behavior of markets. The Russian leadership wanted him to prove the U.S. could not survive the Great Depression. Kondratieff’s research proved otherwise, so Stalin executed the messenger in 1938., but he couldn’t silence the message.

Economic downturns are painful. And necessary. And predictable.

In Texas, public school systems will be the hardest hit institutions due to dependencies on property tax revenue and extreme public indebtedness. Here in Rockwall, 65% of our property taxes go to the public school system.

The Appraisal Board can appraise all they wish, but fact of the matter is this: if a property owner can’t pay his or her taxes, that government entity will run short of cash quickly.

In this coming economic cycle, many governments will break down due to insolvency, including state governments.

How do you prepare for the inevitable?

  1. First and foremost, have faith in God. Read and study the Bible.
  2. Second, Learn from history as does Mr. Faber.
  3. Third, get out of debt as fast as you can and have ready cash on hand.
  4. Recognize how economic cycles are pretty much like day and night. A sunrise follows every sunset. Instead of losing hope, look forward expectantly to the next economic ‘sunrise’.

The Bible points to specific strategies that can help you.

What’s my plan? I will follow my own advice.

John White
Rockwall, Texas

Durable Government: Foundations vs Framework (Do you know the difference?)

God isn’t mentioned in the Constitution” say the atheists and the ignorant. I agree. The Name(s) of God are not to be found anywhere in the U.S. Constitution.

The heads of my liberal naysayers will explode when I say this about the foundation ofdurable government our nation: The Constitution is not the foundation. It is the framework.

Let’s define terms. Shall we? The following definitions are from the WordReference.com online dictionary.

Nationa large body of people, associated with a particular territory, that is sufficiently conscious of its unity to seek or to possess a government peculiarly its own.

Foundationthe base on which some structure rests.

Frameworka skeletal structure designed to support something.

We the People began to become a nation while still under the constitutional monarchy of Great Britain. Before the American Revolution, our colonial forefathers were citizens of that global empire.

Thirteen individual and autonomous states comprised our particular territory when these colonies signed a peace treaty with that empire in 1783.

Each of the thirteen states drew up their own constitutional frameworks of government. It was a compact between those thirteen states that united us as a confederacy. The framework of  that confederate government could be likened to a shack that was unable to weather storms.

On May 25, 1787 delegates of all the states except Rhode Island convened a constitutional convention in Philadelphia. The original intent was to modify or fix the confederate constitution so the states could go forward as a strong nation. This did not happen.

After weeks of debates and hand-wringing, the convention was wholly unfruitful. It was at this point Founding Father Benjamin Franklin took the floor with his famous speech that turned the convention upside down. You can read his famous speech via this link: Franklin’s Appeal for Prayer at the Constitutional Convention

Instead of fixing an unworkable confederacy, the convention of 1787 produced the U.S. Constitution, the framework of our present-day federal government.

Construction professionals know to first lay a sturdy foundation before hammering together the frame of a structure.

Our present-day Constitution is a rhetorical framework for government that rests upon a philosophical foundation.

The Declaration of Independence declares the philosophical foundation for these United States of America. I quote from the second paragraph:

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.–That to secure these rights, Governments are instituted among Men, deriving their just powers from the consent of the governed...”

Creatora person or thing that creates.

The philosophical foundation upon which the framework of our government rests is acknowledgement of  God as our supreme authority.

To my knowledge, there are only two nations in all history that share this same philosophical foundation: Israel and the U.S.A.

To support the above, I refer you to page 66 of the book titled One Nation Under God: A Factual History of America’s Religious Heritage By Leon G Stevens.

34% of the Founding Fathers’ quotes came directly out of the Bible

Atheists, agnostics and liberal educators diligently and relentlessly strive to blot out all mention of God in text books, public institutions, universities, and even the hallowed halls of Congress. But, there it is.

John White
Rockwall, Texas

 For in him [God] we live and move and exist…

facebook symboltwitter-bird-blue-on-white

Boys will be _______ ?

Christina Hoff Sommers, a scholar at the American Enterprise InstituteAmerican Enterprise InstituteAmerican Enterprise Institute, explains how boys are being deprived of natural boy behaviors in public schools. Her presentation discusses the problem and she articulates the ‘cure’.

Get your Google on and discover the consequences of the feminization of boys in American society. Here are search topics and counts of associated internet pages addressing this issue.

  • “negative effects of feminism on society” 743,000 pages
  • “how to raise a feminist son” 13,600,000 pages
  • “feminists and transgender activists” 701,000 pages
  • “how does the number of transgender boys in 2017 compare to 20 years ago” 1,680,000,000 pages

Feminism isn’t about promoting females; it’s a war on males. The facts and numbers are unmistakable: feminist activism is at the root of the transgender phenomenon.

  • “how does the number of transgender suicides in 2017 compare to 20 years ago” 92,300,000 pages

What’s behind the feminization of boys? Initially, feminism was all about raising the status of women to a level playing field with men in salaries, opportunities, etc. But, the redefinition of traditional (globally traditional) male-female roles was taken over by liberal feminists who moved on to promoting the LGBT movement.

Liberal feminism was aggressive then, but a quite different quality of aggression to the

spiteful malevolence we see now. – Ex-feminist Helen Pluckrose

 

girls-vs-boys-at-play
Image: Grandparents.com

 

Ex-feminist Helen Pluckrose describes how postmodernism has affected American society in an article written for Aero Magazine, 29 Dec. 2016.

“Very simplistically, [postmodernism] was an academic shift pioneered by Jean-Francois Lyotard and Jean Baudrillard which denied that reliable knowledge could ever be attained and claimed that meaning and reality themselves had broken down. It rejected large, overarching explanations (meta-narratives) which included religion but also science, and replaced them with subjective, relative accounts (mini-narratives) of the experiences of an individual or sub-cultural group. These ideas gained great currency in the humanities and social sciences and so became both an artistic movement and a social “theory.” They rejected the values of universal liberalism, the methods of science and the use of reason and critical thinking as the way to determine truth and form ethics.”

Read the full article via this link: WHY I NO LONGER IDENTIFY AS A FEMINIST

As is socialism, postmodernism remains forever a theory because it can never be proven to work.

A second reference was written in 2010 by Arthur L. Petterway, a Houston ISD principal.

IMPLEMENTING POSTMODERNISM IN CHANGING THE ROLE OF SCHOOL ADMINISTRATORS IN AMERICA’S SCHOOLS

“Gone are the days when school administrators merely functioned as principals or head teachers who are revered and feared at the same time by their subordinates. Today, the work of administrators has moved away from leadership and towards management and has continually posed problems so challenging and daunting enough to erode the very core administrative values that they were trained to embrace in the first place.”

Public schools have become the laboratories of postmodernists where social engineering replaces academia, scholarship, and critical thinking.

What’s the cure? Get your children out of public schools and into private Christian schools or, better still, homeschools where boys are allowed to be boys and girls allowed to be girls, all while on an equal footing for leadership opportunities.

John White
Rockwall, Texas

Thirteen Other Reasons Why Schools Are Creating a Lost Generation

This article was originally published on FEE.org

thirteen other reasons why schools are creating a lost generation.PNG

Netflix’s recent announcement that it would be producing a second season of Thirteen Reasons Why has raised new questions about the disastrous state of the US public school system and its effects on the economy.

“Hey, it’s Hannah Baker,” says the show’s protagonist, played by a stunning Katherine Langford in the opening episode. “Get settled in. Because I’m about to tell you the story of my life. More specifically, why my life ended.”

Today’s high school graduates emerge with few skills, little education and a sanitized view of the world.

The Thirteen Reasons’ portrait of how a stifling, bureaucratic system progressively cuts this teenage girl to pieces, eventually driving her to death, provides a dramatized, insightful reflection on (another) emerging lost generation.

The statistics are grim: a third of 18- to 34-year-olds in the U.S. live at home according to the US Census Bureau. Homeserve USA finds that nearly one in three Americans can’t come up with $500 to fund an emergency. As if that were not enough, according to the US Congressional Budget Office, governments have saddled today’s young with more than $100 trillion worth of pension and healthcare debts.

The harder truth depicted in Thirteen Reasons Why is that today’s high school graduates emerge with few skills, little education and a sanitized view of the world. In short, they are totally unprepared to take on the challenges they face.

Following are Thirteen Reasons Why:

  1. Thirteen years in jail

In Thirteen Reasons, Hannah, the bullied protagonist has no way to escape a toxic environment. Her helpless position progressively worsens and eventually drives her to suicide.

Because education is compulsory in the United States, Hannah lives in a de facto prison. She cannot change schools or classes without parental approval and undergoing a humiliating bureaucratic process.

An education system that prioritized learning would put students at the center, leaving them free to choose their schools, classes, teachers and programs.

  1. American kids can’t vote

The challenges facing American kids are exacerbated by the fact that they aren’t allowed to vote. They thus have little stake in the system, no sense of responsibility and adopt a de facto poise of helplessness.

  1. Students come last

None of the dozen studies reviewed for this article assessed the US public education system based on students’ needs.

Governments prioritize public education based on its effects on national competitiveness. Businesses focus on getting skilled workers (whose training they don’t want to pay for). Teachers’ unions focus on salaries and working conditions.

The upshot is that students’ interests come last.

  1. Bloated administrations

America spends more per student than any other country yet ranks 14th in terms of results, behind Russia. Must of this is due to legions of highly-paid administrators that clog the system with rules, regulations and forms, few of which prioritize education.

  1. Kids taught to worship government; shun individual responsibility

The young have always been concerned with social causes. It’s thus hardly surprising that teachers would encourage students to prioritize government’s role in healthcare, welfare and environmental regulation.

However today’s public schools offer essentially no counter arguments about individual responsibility.

High school graduates thus emerge as easy prey for politicians who claim that near-unlimited government spending and borrowing are the cure for the nation’s problems. ( See the Krugman con ).

  1. Public schools teach no marketable skills

The greatest indictment of the public-school system’s actual performance relates to the fact that students graduate with no marketable skills.

If America’s kids emerged from schools able to read, write, do basic math, type, work as a team and use a half dozen common software packages, they would have something to show for their 13 years in the slammer.

  1. Banning Ayn Rand and Huckleberry Finn

Socrates’ motto at the Agora was to “question everything.” However public schools prioritize politically correct doctrine that consciously excludes key ideas and concepts.

Ayn Rand, the most important philosopher of the 20th century, is essentially banned from the public system, as is Mark Twain’s Huckleberry Finn, which Hemingway cited as the root of American literature. History teaching in America, as Niall Ferguson has noted, is sanitized to the point of rendering it almost counterproductive.

  1. State-directed curricula: one size fits all

Students vary as do the communities they live in. However a disproportionate amount of teaching is dictated by bureaucrats. This leaves teachers little flexibility to adjust based on students’ needs.

These differ based on whether the school in located in poorer neighborhoods where many students come from single family homes, or in upper middle-class professional communities where traditional family structures are more common.

  1. Kids graduate clueless about finances

Public schools teach essentially nothing about managing money, likely the single most important life skill a kid could have. Students graduate thus thinking that borrowing is fine.

This leaves them prey to America’s biggest predatory lenders: big universities, which have managed to saddle youth with $1.2 trillion worth of debts, many of whom have little to show for it .

  1. “Hoop jumper” worship: drives out the talented and curious

One of the biggest weaknesses in public and private schools is their collective worship of “hoop jumpers,” – that universal collection of the obsequious sorts that clutter Dean’s lists and other “Top Students” awards.

Students who challenge conventional thinking are smiled at and given a B.

This wouldn’t be a problem if schools were able to correctly identify top performers. However heavy state-defined curricula force teachers to “teach to the test.”

This leads to the advancement of drone-like students who are able to recite mindless data, massaged concepts and formulas, and more dangerously: with the need to guess and kow-tow to what teachers want them to say.

Worse, in two centuries of public schooling, teachers still fall for that old trap of giving the best marks to kids with nice hand-writing or to math students who get the wrong answer but manage to “show their work.” Students who challenge conventional thinking are smiled at and given a B.

The upshot is the students with drive, curiosity and creativity are quickly driven out.

The number one students – like John Maynard Keynes, the father of modern economics, who taught that the best way to get rich was to spend more than you earn – rocket through the system, and now run the nation’s central banks and university economics departments.

You get the picture.

  1. Powerful unions

In a world in which students are stuck in de facto prisons, teachers, who spend more time with them than their parents do, ought to be their biggest backers. They aren’t.

Teachers thus need to accept the lion’s share of the blame for the disastrous state of American schools.

That blame starts with the fact that teachers’ first priority has been to band into powerful unions, which put salaries, benefits and vacation time first and students’ interests last.

  1. Millionaire teachers

Many of the best teachers decline towards mediocrity as their careers advance.

True, teachers perform one of society’s most useful functions. However during a time of strained public finances students’ needs must come first – not teachers’ salaries.

The teachers’ unions have been hugely successful. Median compensation for US workers is $28,900. Teachers earn $58,000, almost double that amount .

The gap between teachers and those communities they teach in is exacerbated by the fact that gold-plated, state-guaranteed pensions mean that public school teachers generally retire as millionaires.

If teachers were paid at market rates, there would be more money available to fund students’ needs such as smaller class sizes, libraries and computers.

  1. Mediocre teachers that can’t be fired

Teachers begin their careers ranked among most socially-committed of any professionals. But as with any human beings, a change takes hold of teachers once they acquire tenure and can no longer be fired.

Office hours and volunteer activities shrink, emails from students and parents are returned slower, if at all. The upshot is that many of the best teachers decline towards mediocrity as their careers advance.

This piece appeared first at SprottMoney

Peter Diekmeyer


Peter Diekmeyer
Peter Diekmeyer is a business writer/editor with Sprott Money News, the National Post and Canadian Defence Review. He has studied in MBA, CA and Law programs and filed reports from more than two dozen countries.

Fresno State University Faculty Member Exercises His Free Speech in a Non-Free Speech zone

Students for Life peacefully, and with permission, drew pro-life chalk endorsements on a university walkway. Public Health Department professor Gregory Thatcher denies them their constitutionally protected natural right to free speech.

Thatcher is an alumnus of the University of South Carolina-Columbia.

fresno-state-professor-thatcher-740x352
Source: CNMNewz.com

Watch his assault on the pro-life students recorded in this video.

The outcome? Fresno State student Bernadette Tasy is suing Professor Gregory Thatcher for violating her First Amendment constitutional right to free speech.

Fresno State Student Bernadette Tasy sues Professor Gregory Thatcher
Source: The Fresno Bee, 11 May 2017

The takeaway is this: When graduates of Rockwall, Rockwall-Heath, and Royse City high school students encounter rogue authority in institutions of higher learning, they have legal recourse. They can sue.

Learn more about Students for Life. Click on the banner below.

students for life banner.PNG

John White
Rockwall, Texas

Bundle Up! – What you need to know about real climate change

Al Gore touted global warming as a consequence of human activity. His book An Inconvenient Truth sold throughout the world. His speaking fees and royalties made him a wealthy man indeed.

 

Al Gore book - an inconvenient truth
Available from Barnes and Noble 

The paperback version originally sold for over $10.00 and now are available online for under $3.00.

 

His next book, The Future: Six Drivers of Global Change, is likewise now available for around $2.00.

In 2007, Al Gore and the U.N. IPCC shared a Nobel Peace Prize “for their efforts to build up and disseminate greater knowledge about man-made climate change, and to lay the foundations for the measures that are needed to counteract such change”.

Where are we today? Al became fabulously wealthy and the earth’s climate is in fact changing, but in the opposite direction that he predicted.

My one-and-a-half minute video won’t make me millions, but it can make you aware of what style clothing you should plan for in the near term future.


John White
Rockwall, Texas

Ignorance is NOT bliss; ignorance of economics is perilous to your person and to your soul

What time do you invest in your knowledge about economics?John Adams
 
What is money? Is it not proof you have served God’s other children?
 
In the formative years of our Republic, while organized as a confederacy, before ratification of the Constitution, representatives of the thirteen states unsuccessfully quibbled over this or that trade policy.
 
At the Constitutional convention of 1787, founding father John Adams pointed to the central issue: widespread ignorance of economics fundamentals, saying, “All the perplexities, confusion and distress in America arise not from defects in the Constitution or Confederation, not from a want of honor or virtue so much as from downright ignorance of the nature of coin, credit, and circulation.”
 
Benjamin Franklin observed, “An investment in knowledge pays the best interest.”
 
The common American ignores economics until it bites him where the sun doesn’t shine. And when he or she feels the bite, anger erupts.  Anger, when properly directed is good. God invented anger to motivate us in the right direction.
 
A great chasm of ignorance of economics divides liberals and conservatives. The first subscribes to Marxist socialism; the other (generally) to principles of free-market capitalism.
 
How are the two thoughts different? Socialism is an economic theory. Why a theory? It shall forever remain an economic theory BECAUSE IT HAS NEVER AND CAN NEVER BE PROVEN.
 
Capitalism, by contrast, is a natural system of economics. It is the exchange of goods and services among a free people. By natural, I mean this is God’s idea of economics. Examples?
 
Proverbs 20:10 “False weights and unequal measures — the Lord detests double standards of every kind.”
 
1 Thessalonians 5:22 “Stay away from every kind of evil.”
 
Leviticus 25:14 “When you make an agreement with your neighbor to buy or sell property, you must not take advantage of each other.”
 
Learn how freedom and capitalism are inextricably linked to your personal success. Learn from this 3-minute video titled “An Introduction to Milton Friedman’s Capitalism and Freedom – A Macat Economics Analysis
For the more industrious among you, learn even more from this 10-minute video titled “Economic Schools of Thought: Crash Course Economics #14
John White
Rockwall, Texas